2018 Course Options

Agriculture
Automotive Technology
Biology
Business
Business Administration
Chemistry
Chinese Beginning
Chinese Continuing
Chinese Advanced
Dance
Design Technology & Graphics
Drama
Electronics and Mechatronics
Engineering Studies
English
English / Literature
English - Essential
English as a Second Language (ESL)
English as a Second Language - Bridging (ESL)
Exercise Science
Food For Life
Furniture Construction
Global Studies
History - Ancient
History - Pre-Modern
History - Modern
Hospitality Industry Fundamentals - Service/Kitchen
Hospitality - Cafe Culture & Cafe Operations
Hospitality - Retail Bakery & Patisserie
Information Technology - Applications
Information Technology - Game Design
Information Technology - Programming
Integrated Science
Legal Studies
Literature
Mathematics - Essential
Mathematical Applications
Mathematical Methods
Mathematics - Specialist
Media
Metal Engineering
Music
Outdoor Education
Photography
Physical Education
Physics
Psychology
Sport, Recreation and Leadership
Textiles and Fashion
Tourism and Event Management
Visual Arts
Visual Arts - Graphic Communication and Animation

Agriculture A/M

Agricultural Studies is a broad field that covers the production, management and research of agricultural goods. It crosses disciplines of science (Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Environmental and Earth Science) and makes provision for students who have an interest in science but may not wish to specialise. It is relevant to every consumer.

Hawker College students will learn employable skills through this practical course, learning about native species and the local environment, landscaping, irrigation and land management in our own garden. They will manage seasonal crops that will be used in our school cafe, and engage in authentic modern farming practices through Aquaponics and Agri -robotics.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Agricultural Economics & Local area

Students learn the interactive nature of agricultural production. They focus on agricultural and natural systems, compare different models and study nutrient cycles. Students examine the factors that influence agriculture and that are in turn influenced by agriculture. The concept of agriculture as an ecosystem is an important understanding.

Unit 2: Soil Properties and Plant Production

Students focus on biological and physiological processes in plants and the production and management of plants for commercial purposes. Students learn that plants in agricultural systems cannot be studied without analysing their interactions with elements such as soils, climate, microbes/pests that exist in most farm environments and farm practices and structures

Unit 3: Animal Production

Students learn about the anatomy and physiology of animals, animal husbandry, including genetic breeding and reproductive technologies. They look at effective animal management including processes such as, paddock rotation, animal waste management, cell grazing and biosecurity of animals through control of pest organisms such as parasites and disease. Students examine ethical standards in food production including issues such as animal welfare, live export and food safety.

Unit 4: Negotiated Study

A negotiated study unit has an important place in senior secondary courses.  It is a valuable pedagogical approach that empowers students to make decisions about their own learning.  A negotiated study unit is decided upon by a class, group(s) or individual student in consultation with the teacher and with the Principal’s approval. The program of learning for a negotiated study unit must meet all the content descriptions as appear in the unit.

Automotive Technology A/M/V

This course provides opportunities for students to develop relevant technical, vocational and interpersonal skills suitable for employment and further training in the Automotive Industry.  It meets the needs of students who have a general interest in industrial technology trades as well as those intending to choose a career pathway into traditional trades and related service industries.

Hawker college students will get their hands dirty as they learn about the various operating systems in a car. It is a comprehensive course with a practical skills focus in an industry standard workshop. Students do not need prior automotive experience or understanding. The course covers the skills and knowledge required for the certificate in pre vocational automotive.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Automotive Fundamentals

Unit 2: Automotive Electrical Systems

Unit 3: Automotive Engine Systems

Unit 4: Automotive Vehicle Systems

Biology A/T

Biology is the study of the fascinating diversity of life as it has evolved and as it interacts and functions. Investigation of biological systems and their interactions, from cellular processes to ecosystem dynamics, has led to biological knowledge and understanding that enable us to explore and explain everyday observations, find solutions to biological issues, and understand the processes of biological continuity and change over time.

Hawker College students will develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. Students acquire an understanding of the scientific method, gain an understanding of modern techniques through hands-on activities, acquire experience in properly conducting controlled experiments, and develop skills in the reading of scientific literature.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Biodiversity and Connectedness

The current view of the biosphere as a dynamic system composed of Earth’s diverse, interrelated and interacting ecosystems developed from the work of eighteenth and nineteenth century naturalists, who collected, classified, measured and mapped the distribution of organisms and environments around the world. In this unit, students investigate and describe a number of diverse ecosystems, exploring the range of biotic and abiotic components to understand the dynamics, diversity and underlying unity of these systems.

Students develop an understanding of the processes involved in the movement of energy and matter in ecosystems. They investigate ecosystem dynamics, including interactions within and between species, and interactions between abiotic and biotic components of ecosystems. They also investigate how measurements of abiotic factors, population numbers and species diversity, and descriptions of species interactions, can form the basis for spatial and temporal comparisons between ecosystems. Students use classification keys to identify organisms, describe the biodiversity in ecosystems, investigate patterns in relationships between organisms, and aid scientific communication.

Through the investigation of appropriate contexts, students explore how international collaboration, evidence from multiple disciplines and the use of ICT and other technologies have contributed to the study and conservation of national, regional and global biodiversity. They investigate how scientific knowledge is used to offer valid explanations and reliable predictions, and the ways in which scientific knowledge interacts with social, economic, cultural and ethical factors.
Fieldwork is an important part of this unit, providing valuable opportunities for students to work together to collect first-hand data and to experience local ecosystem interactions. In order to understand the interconnectedness of organisms, the physical environment and human activity, students analyse and interpret data collected through investigation of a local environment and from sources relating to other Australian, regional and global environments.

Unit 2: Cells and Organisms

The cell is the basic unit of life. Although cell structure and function are very diverse, all cells possess some common features: all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells need to exchange materials with their immediate external environment in order to maintain the chemical processes vital for cell functioning. In this unit, students examine inputs and outputs of cells to develop an understanding of the chemical nature of cellular systems, both structurally and functionally, and the processes required for cell survival. Students investigate the ways in which matter moves and energy is transformed and transferred in the biochemical processes of photosynthesis and respiration, and the role of enzymes in controlling biochemical systems.

Multicellular organisms typically consist of a number of interdependent systems of cells organised into tissues, organs and organ systems. Students examine the structure and function of plant and animal systems at cell and tissue levels in order to describe how they facilitate the efficient provision or removal of materials to and from all cells of the organism.
Through the investigation of appropriate contexts, students explore how international collaboration, evidence from multiple disciplines and the use of ICT and other technologies have contributed to developing understanding of the structure and function of cells and multicellular organisms. They investigate how scientific knowledge is used to offer valid explanations and reliable predictions, and the ways in which scientific knowledge interacts with social, economic, cultural and ethical factors.

Students use science inquiry skills to explore the relationship between structure and function, by conducting real or virtual dissections and carrying out microscopic examination of cells and tissues. Students consider the ethical considerations that apply to the use of living organisms in research. They develop skills in constructing and using models to describe and interpret data about the functions of cells and organisms.

Unit 3: Heredity and Continuity of Life

Heredity is an important biological principle as it explains why offspring (cells or organisms) resemble their parent cell or organism. Organisms require cellular division and differentiation for growth, development, repair and sexual reproduction. In this unit, students investigate the biochemical and cellular systems and processes involved in the transmission of genetic material to the next generation of cells and to offspring. They consider different patterns of inheritance by analysing the possible genotypes and phenotypes of offspring. Students link their observations to explanatory models that describe patterns of inheritance, and explore how the use of predictive models of inheritance enables decision making.

Students investigate the genetic basis for the theory of evolution by natural selection through constructing, using and evaluating explanatory and predictive models for gene pool diversity of populations. They explore genetic variation in gene pools, selection pressures and isolation effects in order to explain speciation and extinction events and to make predictions about future changes to populations.

Through the investigation of appropriate contexts, students explore the ways in which models and theories related to heredity and population genetics, and associated technologies, have developed over time and through interactions with social, cultural, economic and ethical considerations. They investigate the ways in which science contributes to contemporary debate about local, regional and international issues, including evaluation of risk and action for sustainability, and recognise the limitations of science to provide definitive answers in different contexts.
Students use science inquiry skills to design and conduct investigations into how different factors affect cellular processes and gene pools; they construct and use models to analyse the data gathered; and they continue to develop their skills in constructing plausible predictions and valid, reliable conclusions.

Unit 4: The Internal Environment

In order to survive, organisms must be able to maintain system structure and function in the face of changes in their external and internal environments. Changes in temperature and water availability, and the incidence and spread of infectious disease, present significant challenges for organisms and require coordinated system responses. In this unit, students investigate how homeostatic response systems control organisms’ responses to environmental change – internal and external – in order to survive in a variety of environments, as long as the conditions are within their tolerance limits. Students study how the invasion of an organism’s internal environment by pathogens challenges the effective functioning of cells, tissues and body systems, and triggers a series of responses or events in the short- and long-term in order to maintain system function. They consider the factors that contribute to the spread of infectious disease and how outbreaks of infectious disease can be predicted, monitored and contained.

Through the investigation of appropriate contexts, students explore the ways in which models and theories of organisms’ and populations’ responses to environmental change have developed over time and through interactions with social, economic, cultural and ethical considerations. They investigate the ways in which science contributes to contemporary debate about local, regional and international issues, including evaluation of risk and action for sustainability, and recognise the limitations of science to provide definitive answers in different contexts.

Students use science inquiry skills to investigate a range of responses by plants and animals to changes in their environments and to invasion by pathogens; they construct and use appropriate representations to analyse the data gathered; and they continue to develop their skills in constructing plausible predictions and valid conclusions.

Business A/T/M

This course allows students to learn the essential planning requirements ranging from a small business to the broader roles of finance, human resource management, marketing, operations, sustainability and the impacts for the future business environment. Students develop the skills to create innovative solutions to business problems and will learn to communicate in a variety of contexts.

The study of Business opens up a world of possibilities for potential business managers and those interested in becoming highly productive employees in the workplace. Opportunities include excursions to network with real business leaders in the ACT community, in order to gain insights into business practices. Students discover the key concepts of key business areas such as marketing, finance and operations. Importantly, students learn entrepreneurial, leadership and team skills.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Changing Business Environment

This unit is the foundation for understanding business and its dynamic environment.

Unit 2: Relationship Management

This unit investigates the relationship between businesses, its customers, the wider business environment and its increasing importance for business longevity.

Unit 3: Business Challenges

This unit investigates the importance for business to be responsive to change from the internal and external environments.

Unit 4: Planning for Current Context

This unit investigates the range of tools and strategies utilised by business to plan for success.

Business Administration A/V/M (2018)

This course prepares students for clerical/administrative employment at an operational level and provides pathways to further qualifications in supervision, specialist occupations and management in a range of industries. Students will be able to carry out a range of entry-level tasks in a position, such as administrative assistant and be eligible for appropriate credit towards courses offered by other training providers.

Business services include management and administration; human resource management; marketing and advertising; record-keeping, processing accounts and financial documents; and customer service. Business administration forms part of the business service industry sector, and is growing at the rate of 5% per year.  The business services workforce is the second largest cross-industry occupational group in Australia and is traditionally open to school leavers.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: The Work Environment / Working in Business

Unit 2: Business Operations / Business Finances

Unit 3: Using Business Documents / Create Business Documents

Unit 4: Business Practices / Customer Service in Business

Chemistry T

Chemistry is the study of materials and substances, and the transformations they undergo through interactions and the transfer of energy. Chemists can use an understanding of chemical structures and processes to adapt, control and manipulate systems to meet particular economic, environmental and social needs.

Hawker College students will develop analytical and problem solving skills through examining and interpreting results and making evaluations based on limited information. Students learn to appreciate the world on the macro-scale, such as synthesis of medicine, plastics or biomolecules, while learning the underlying principles occurring on the molecular level.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Chemical Fundamentals

Chemists design and produce a vast range of materials for many purposes, including for fuels, cosmetics, building materials and pharmaceuticals. As the science of chemistry has developed over time, there has been an increasing realisation that the properties of a material depend on, and can be explained by, the material’s structure. A range of models at the atomic and molecular scale enable explanation and prediction of the structure of materials and how this structure influences properties and reactions. In this unit, students relate matter and energy in chemical reactions, as they consider the breaking and reforming of bonds as new substances are produced. Students can use materials that they encounter in their lives as a context for investigating the relationships between structure and properties.

Through the investigation of appropriate contexts, students explore how evidence from multiple disciplines and individuals and the development of ICT and other technologies have contributed to developing understanding of atomic structure and chemical bonding. They explore how scientific knowledge is used to offer reliable explanations and predictions, and the ways in which it interacts with social, economic, cultural and ethical factors.

Students use science inquiry skills to develop their understanding of patterns in the properties and composition of materials. They investigate the structure of materials by describing physical and chemical properties at the macroscopic scale, and use models of structure and primary bonding at the atomic and sub-atomic scale to explain these properties. They are introduced to the mole concept as a means of quantifying matter in chemical reactions.

Unit 2: Molecules

In this unit, students develop their understanding of the physical and chemical properties of materials including gases, water and aqueous solutions, acids and bases. Students explore the characteristic properties of water that make it essential for physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth, including the properties of aqueous solutions. They investigate and explain the solubility of substances in water, and compare and analyse a range of solutions. They learn how rates of reaction can be measured and altered to meet particular needs, and use models of energy transfer and the structure of matter to explain and predict changes to rates of reaction. Students gain an understanding of how to control the rates of chemical reactions, including through the use of a range of catalysts.

Through the investigation of appropriate contexts, students explore how evidence from multiple disciplines and individuals and the development of ICT and other technologies have contributed to developing understanding of intermolecular forces and chemical reactions. They explore how scientific knowledge is used to offer reliable explanations and predictions, and the ways in which it interacts with social, economic, cultural and ethical factors.

Students use a range of practical and research inquiry skills to investigate chemical reactions, including the prediction and identification of products and the measurement of the rate of reaction. They investigate the behaviour of gases, and use the kinetic theory to predict the effects of changing temperature, volume and pressure in gaseous systems.

Unit 3: Equilibrium and Redox Reactions

The idea of reversibility of reaction is vital in a variety of chemical systems at different scales, ranging from the processes that release carbon dioxide into our atmosphere to the reactions of ions within individual cells in our bodies. Processes that are reversible will respond to a range of factors and can achieve a state of dynamic equilibrium. In this unit, students investigate acid-base equilibrium systems and their applications. They use contemporary models to explain the nature of acids and bases, and their properties and uses. This understanding enables further exploration of the varying strengths of acids and bases. Students investigate the principles of oxidation and reduction reactions and the production of electricity from electrochemical cells.

Through the investigation of appropriate contexts, students explore the ways in which models and theories related to acid-base and redox reactions, and their applications, have developed over time and through interactions with social, economic, cultural and ethical considerations. They explore the ways in which chemistry contributes to contemporary debate in industrial and environmental contexts, including the use of energy, evaluation of risk and action for sustainability, and they recognise the limitations of science in providing definitive answers in different contexts.

Students use science inquiry skills to investigate the principles of dynamic chemical equilibrium and how these can be applied to chemical processes and systems. They investigate a range of electrochemical cells, including the choice of materials used and the voltage produced by these cells. Students use the pH scale to assist in making judgments and predictions about the extent of dissociation of acids and bases and about the concentrations of ions in an aqueous solution.

Unit 4: Structure, Synthesis and design

Current and future applications of chemistry include the development of specialised techniques to create, or synthesise, new substances to meet the specific needs of society, including pharmaceuticals, fuels, polymers and nanomaterials. In this unit, students focus on the principles and application of chemical synthesis, particularly in organic chemistry. This involves considering where and how functional groups can be incorporated into already existing carbon compounds in order to generate new substances with properties that enable them to be used in a range of contexts.

Through the investigation of appropriate contexts, students explore the ways in which models and theories related to chemical synthesis, structure and design, and associated applications, have developed over time and through interactions with social, economic, cultural and ethical considerations. They explore the ways in which chemistry contributes to contemporary debate regarding current and future uses of local, regional and international resources, evaluation of risk and action for sustainability, and they recognise the limitations of science in providing definitive answers in different contexts.

Students use science inquiry skills to investigate the principles and application of chemical structure, synthesis and design. They select and use data from instrumental analysis to determine the identity and structure of a range of organic materials. They make predictions based on knowledge of types of chemical reactions, and investigate chemical reactions qualitatively and quantitatively.

Chinese Beginning A/T

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of the language. Learning a language is fun and challenging, and offers a broad learning experience. It also develops an understanding of English and how to communicate effectively with people from other cultural backgrounds. With globalisation, it is becoming more important to communicate in other languages.

Chinese is the language of communication of approximately one quarter of the world’s population. It is one of the official languages of the United Nations. China has a significant profile in economic, political and cultural developments, both globally and, in particular, in the Asia-Pacific region.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: The World Around Us

Unit 2: Society and Community

Unit 3: Lifestyle and Tradition

Unit 4: The Individual’s Experience

Chinese Continuing A/T

The continuing course is for students who have studied the language in years 9 and 10 as well as in junior secondary or primary school. It is also for native speakers who have not completed primary school education in a Chinese-speaking region. Students at Hawker College will acquire fundamental knowledge of the Chinese Language comprising speaking, grammar, reading comprehension and writing skills.

Skills developed in language learning include higher order thinking skills, independent and collaborative learning, problem solving and strategies for decoding unfamiliar language.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1:  The World Around Us

Unit 2: Society and Community

Unit 3: Lifestyle and Tradition

Unit 4: The Individual’s Experience

Chinese Advanced T

Students entering an advanced language course should have reached an advanced level of spoken and written language.  This course is a bi-lingual course and students are required to work in Mandarin and English. Chinese can be studied at the advanced level by application.

Learning a language strengthens intellectual and analytical capability and enhances creative and critical thinking. Students at this level develop a deeper understanding of linguistic and stylistic features of Chinese language, culture, and communication. Hawker College students will require discipline and systematic study habits characterised by effective planning and organisation.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: The World Around Us

Unit 2: Society and Community

Unit 3: Lifestyle and Tradition

Unit 4: The Individual’s Experience

Dance A/T

This course develops and improves students in a range of dance styles both traditional and popular. The classes are appropriate for students with a classical ballet background, jazz, contemporary and other styles. Students with previous dance experience are challenged by this course and beginning students are supported in their development of dance skills.

Dance students participate in training workshops, learn to develop choreographic skills and develop dances to performance standard. Each year the dancers participate in Dance Festival and other arts events at the school, along with excursions to popular shows and dance productions.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1:  Dance Foundations; Dance in our Time

Unit 2:  Dance Production; Dance and Entertainment

Unit 3:  Contemporary Dance; Classical Dance

Unit 4: World Dance; Dance in Australia

Design Technology & Graphics A/T/M

The study of Design Technology and Graphics explores the purposeful use of technologies and creative processes to produce design solutions. Students acquire knowledge and develop skills using technologies and other processes appropriately, to design and create graphic solutions, products, systems and built environments with a mind to a ‘preferred future’.

Students develop skills from basic design and project management, utilising industry standard software, through to the development of complex 3D modelling with the aim of producing prototypes of their designs utilising the college’s 3D printing and Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) capability. Design Technology and Graphics prepares students for tertiary studies which can lead to a variety of careers including engineering, architecture and industrial design. Students can also compete in the University of Wollongong’s STEM competitions.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Industrial Design Foundation

Unit 2: CAD Industrial Design

Unit 3: Architecture Foundation

Unit 4:.Architecture Applications

Drama A/T

Drama offers students an opportunity to develop competence and confidence in performance. Students participate in productions as part of their studies and learn teamwork and responsibility. Skills are taught to a high standard and students receive training in voice, movement, characterisation and a variety of theatrical styles.

Students may use Drama to achieve entrance to tertiary studies, learn technical production skills to enter industry, or improve all pathways through enhanced communication skills developed in this course. Other students learn technical production skills and train to enter the industry. All pathways are improved by the enhanced communication skills students develop in this course.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Theatre for Young People, Comedy, Voice and Movement

The focus of this unit is to explore and appreciate the value of theatre designed and intended for young people. Students are provided with the opportunity to devise and perform theatre to inform, entertain and educate their audience. The unit will explore the importance of establishing interaction and rapport between the young performers and their audience.

Unit 2:  Actor and Director, Theatre Production and Performance, Performing Shakespeare

The focus of this unit is to explore the role, purpose and focus of the actor and the director and to understand their relationship in making theatre.

Unit 3: Dramatic Explorations, Experimental Theatre, Voice and Movement

The focus of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental elements of Drama as well as the historical influences and styles such as Stanislavski, Brecht, and Artaud on the development of theatre.

Unit 4:.Devising and Ensemble Production, Community Theatre, Modern and Classical Tragedy

This unit is designed for students to work as an ensemble to create and present original theatrical work/s for an intended target audience either within the school community or for regional or interstate theatre festivals. The content studied will be determined by the production requirements and may draw on a wide range of both conventional play building techniques and/or specific art forms such as masked theatre, physical theatre or puppetry.

Electronics and Mechatronics A/T/M

This is a two year specialisation in the Electronics and Mechatronics Engineering Discipline. Students will learn about fundamental principles of electrical and electronic circuits and how they can be controlled via microcontrollers. This course explores the use of such engineering disciplines in such areas such as Control, Gaming, Launch, and more traditional implementations of mechatronics such as robotics.

Electronics/Mechatronics students will learn how to design, evaluate, build, and control systems. From low level electronics to micro controllers, students will engage in and solve meaningful and interesting problems with gaming interfaces, Launchpad systems, and large scale physical games.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Safety, Circuits, and Solenoids

The science understanding strand comprises of two alternate electives. For a standard 1.0 unit, students must study either the electronic or mechatronic strand of science understandings. In both electives of this unit, students will identify electrical hazards and implement various safety measures. They will measure electrical quantities and apply basic principles to electronic or mechatronic components and circuits. Students will be introduced to electromagnetism and will use various tools and techniques in construction and analysis activities. Finally they will gain a historical and societal perspective on the development and application of electronics or mechatronics.

Unit 2: Semiconductors and Systems

The science understanding strand comprises of two alternate electives. For a standard 1.0 unit, students must study either the electronic or mechatronic strand in Science Understandings.. In the electronics elective, students will study the structures, operations and applications of a range of semiconductor devices in analog circuits. In the mechatronics elective, students will study the application of mechatronics to pilot and unpiloted vehicles, becoming familiar with their systems, sensors and other aspects of control.

Unit 3: Digital and Analog Interactions

The science understanding strand comprises of two alternate electives. For a standard 1.0 unit, students must study either the electronic or mechatronic strand . In the electronics elective, students will study the theory and application of digital electronics through a range of individual components and their uses in computer systems and analog interfaces. In the mechatronics elective, students will study the fundamentals of microcontrollers and their interactions with physical systems including I/O devices, programming and communications.

Unit 4: AC and Advanced Applications

The science understanding strand comprises of two alternate electives. For a standard 1.0 unit, students must study either the electronic or mechatronic strand. In the electronic elective, students will study electromagnetism in its application to a range of devices and in the generation and use of alternating current. In the mechatronics elective, students will study advanced microcontroller systems, programming and techniques.

Engineering Studies T

Through practical, hands-on experiences, students will research, analyse and design their own solutions for real-world problems. Engineering Studies equips students with the skills and knowledges to become innovators.

Students will develop and refine the skills that will support them to create technical solutions to complicated, real world, and meaningful problems. Students participate in a range of engineering challenges that require them to conceive, design, and then build their solutions using a range of industry standards. Projects include Gaming Interfaces for Disabled Gamers and Land/Air based drones and systems.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Engineering Design and Drawing

Unit 2: Aerospace Engineering

Unit 3: Mechatronic Engineering

Unit 4: Major Engineering Project

English T

English T is for students who wish to continue their studies at university level. To study at this level, students should have successfully completed Level 1 or 2 English at high school.  Assessment tasks ask students to respond, create and investigate, commonly but not exclusively in the form of essays, creative responses and oral presentations.

The study of English develops students’ ability to become effective users of language and producers of texts. English T focuses on developing evaluative, analytical, and creative thinking skills through a study of a diverse range of texts.)

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Communication of Meaning

In Unit 1, students explore how meaning is communicated through the relationships between language, text, purpose, context and audience. This includes how language and texts are shaped by their purpose, the audiences for whom they are intended and the contexts in which they are created and received. Through responding to and creating texts, students consider how language, structure and conventions operate in a variety of imaginative, interpretive and persuasive texts. Study in this unit focuses on the similarities and differences between texts and how visual elements combine with spoken and written elements to create meaning. Students develop an understanding of stylistic features and apply skills of analysis and creativity. They are able to respond to texts in a variety of ways, creating their own texts and reflecting on their own learning.

Unit 2: Representations Through Texts

In Unit 2, students analyse the representation of ideas, attitudes and voices in texts to consider how texts represent the world and human experience. Analysis of how language and structural choices shape perspectives in and for a range of contexts is central to this unit. By responding to and creating texts in different modes and mediums, students consider the interplay of imaginative, interpretive and persuasive elements in a range of texts and present their own analyses. Students examine the effect of stylistic choices and the ways in which these choices position audiences for particular purposes, revealing attitudes, values and perspectives. Through the creation of their own texts, students are encouraged to reflect on their language choices and consider why they have represented ideas in particular ways.

Unit 3: Comparative Texts

In Unit 3, students explore representations of themes, ideas and concepts through a comparison of texts. They analyse and compare the relationships between language, genre and context, comparing texts within and/or across different genres and modes. Students recognise and analyse the conventions of genre in literary and non-literary texts and consider how those conventions may assist interpretation and how they may be challenged. Students compare and evaluate the effect of different mediums on the structure of texts and how audiences respond to them. Understanding of these concepts is demonstrated through the creation of imaginative, interpretive and analytical

Unit 4: Perspectives

In Unit 4, students examine different interpretations and perspectives to develop further their knowledge and analysis of purpose and style. They challenge perspectives, values and attitudes in literary and non-literary texts, developing and testing their own interpretations though debate and argument. Through close study of individual texts, students explore relationships between content and structure, voice and perspective and the text and its context. This provides the opportunity for students to extend their experience of language and of texts and explore their ideas through their own reading and viewing. Students demonstrate understanding of the texts studied through creation of imaginative, interpretive and analytical responses.

English / Literature T

The English/Literature course allows students to combine units from the English T and Literature T courses to achieve an English/Literature minor, major, major minor or double major. English and Literature units are cognitively similar. The key difference is in range and type of texts studied: Literature units focus predominantly on literary texts; English units cover a wider range of text types.

Students may move between English and Literature or study both courses concurrently. English/Literature T gives students a broad experience of English and suits students who intend to continue their studies at university level.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Ways of Reading and Creating

Unit 2: Intertextuality

Unit 3: Power of Literature

Unit 4: Literary Interpretations

English - Essential A/M

The Essential English course is for students who wish to undertake a practical English course. It is designed to develop students’ language, literature and literacy skills, which enable them to interact confidently and effectively with others in everyday, community and applied learning contexts including further education, training and the workplace.

Accredited (A) English is for students who may not wish to continue their studies at university level. Assessment tasks ask students to respond, create and investigate, commonly but not exclusively in the form of essays, creative responses and oral presentations. This course aims to provide students with skills that will empower them to succeed in a wide range of post-secondary pathways.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Comprehending and Responding

Unit 1 focuses on students comprehending and responding to the ideas and information presented in texts drawn from a range of contexts. Students are taught a variety of strategies to assist comprehension. They read, view and listen to texts to connect, interpret and visualise ideas. They learn how to respond personally and logically to texts, by questioning, using inferential reasoning and determining the importance of content and structure. The unit considers how organisational features of texts help the audience to understand the text. It emphasises the relationships between context, purpose and audience in different language modes and types of texts, and their impact on meaning. Students learn to interact with others in everyday and other contexts. Emphasis is placed on the communication of ideas and information both accurately and imaginatively through a range of modes. Students apply their understanding of language through the creation of texts for different purposes in real or imagined contexts.

Unit 2: Making Connections

Unit 2 focuses on interpreting ideas and arguments in a range of texts and contexts. By analysing text structures and language features and identifying the ideas, arguments and values expressed, students make inferences about the purposes and the intended audiences of texts. Students examine the connections between purpose and structure and how a text’s meaning is influenced by the context in which it is created and received. Students integrate relevant information and ideas from texts to develop their own interpretations. They learn to interact appropriately and persuasively with others in a range of contexts. Analytical and creative skills are developed by focusing on how language selection, imagery, type of text and mode can achieve specific effects. Knowledge and understanding of language and literacy skills are consolidated and demonstrated through the analysis and creation of a range of texts for different purposes, selected from real or imagined contexts.

Unit 3: Understanding Perspectives

Unit 3 focuses on exploring different points of view presented in a range of texts and contexts. Students analyse attitudes, text structures and language features to understand a text’s meaning and purpose. They consider how perspectives and values are represented in texts to influence specific audiences. When responding to texts, students reflect on a range of interpretations as they develop their own interpretations. Students learn to articulate reasoned and persuasive arguments and to develop an understanding of purpose and context. When interacting with others, the emphasis is on identifying and understanding differing perspectives. Students learn how to communicate logically, persuasively and imaginatively in a range of different contexts, for different purposes, using a variety of types of texts.

Unit 4: Local and Global

Unit 4 focuses on community, local or global issues and ideas presented in texts and on developing students’ reasoned responses to them. Students develop independent points of view by synthesising information from a range of sources, and analysing how ideas, attitudes and values are represented. The way in which authors use evidence, persuasive techniques and language choices to influence and position audiences is analysed. This unit provides the opportunity for students to discuss and listen to differing perspectives, draw conclusions, negotiate, problem-solve, persuade, as well as engage audiences for a range of purposes and in different contexts. Emphasis is placed on articulating and constructing coherent, logical and sustained arguments and demonstrating an understanding of purpose, audience and context. When creating their own imaginative, analytical and interpretive texts, students are encouraged to consider their intended purpose, their representation of ideas and issues, and audience response.

English as a Second Language (ESL) A/T

The ESL course is designed for students whose understanding and effective use of Standard Australian English is still developing. ESL is of equal value and rigour to all other English courses, with a particular emphasis on developing academic English skills.  An explicit teaching of structure, language and social/cultural aspects of Standard Australian English benefits ESL students in their studies across all curriculum areas and for future study and work. It also assists students to engage effectively with the college and wider Australian community.

ESL students explore how learning in and through English language and literature influences social and cultural identities and ways of thinking. They develop skills to use different registers of spoken and written English so they can communicate effectively in a range of situations and for different purposes.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Language and Culture

Unit 1 focuses on investigating how language and culture are interrelated and expressed in a range of contexts. A variety of oral, written and multimodal texts are used to develop understanding of text structures and language features. Students explore the relationship between these structures and features and the context, purpose and audience of texts. The unit will enhance students’ confidence in creating texts for different purposes and across all language modes in both real and imagined contexts. It will broaden their understanding of the sociocultural and sociolinguistic elements of SAE and develop skills for research and further academic study.

Unit 2: Perspectives in Texts

Unit 2 focuses on analysing and evaluating perspectives and attitudes presented in texts and creating extended texts for a range of contexts. SAE language skills for effective communication in an expanding range of contexts are consolidated. The use of cohesive text structures and language features is developed. The unit focuses on developing planning and editing skills to create extended oral, written and multimodal texts. Attitudes, values and culturally based assumptions within texts are identified, analysed and compared. Strategies for collecting, analysing, organising and presenting ideas and information are refined.

Unit 3: Communication

Unit 3 focuses on analysing how language choices are used to achieve different purposes and effects in a range of contexts. SAE language skills are developed so that they can be used to describe, inform, express a point of view and persuade for different purposes and audiences. The ways in which language choices shape meaning and influence audiences are explored through the study and creation of a range of oral, written and multimodal texts. The representation of ideas, attitudes and values and how these vary across cultures and within different contexts, particularly the Australian context, is analysed and evaluated. Effective and independent research skills are consolidated throughout the unit

Unit 4: Issues and Attitudes

Unit 4 focuses on analysing, evaluating and using language to represent and respond to issues, ideas and attitudes in a range of contexts. By extending and consolidating language and communication skills, critical use of SAE for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences is developed. Independent and collaborative investigation and analysis are used to explore how language and texts achieve specific purposes and effects. Extended oral, written and multimodal texts and presentations are created, adapted and refined for a variety of contexts, purposes and audiences. Effective research strategies and referencing protocols are used to present ideas, information, conclusions, arguments and recommendations

English as a Second Language - Bridging (ESL) A

The Bridging ESL course assists students who are new to Australia to build their knowledge, understanding and skills in using Standard Australian English.  With a focus on language and literacy, Bridging ESL provides a foundation for work, training or further study.

The course is designed for students who are in the early stages of English language acquisition and need assistance to develop their skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing English. It has a particular focus on communication skills. Hawker College ESL students may study Bridging ESL A in addition to ESL T/A to maximise their English language development.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Communication Foundations

Unit 2: Consolidate Communication

Unit 3: Responding to Texts

Unit 4: Connecting Through Texts

Exercise Science A/T

Exercise Science examines the biological, physiological, biomechanical and psychological, interrelationship and influences on performance and participation in physical activity. This discipline will expose students to knowledge and skills, including those who wish to pursue further study at a tertiary level as well as training settings and pathways. Students develop insights into the science underpinning sports performance and movement.

This course will be useful for students considering courses in physiotherapy, nursing and associated medical/health areas or teaching. It is also useful if students are intending to do Fitness and Recreation at CIT, or even if just interested in coaching, sport; or would like to understand more about personal performance and how to live a healthy lifestyle.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Anatomy and Physiology

Unit 2: Sports Performance and Nutrition

Unit 3: Exercise Physiology and Sports Medicine

Unit 4: Biomechanics and Sports Psychology

Food For Life A/M

This practically focused course has been developed for students with an interest in food, health and well-being. Its main focus is on the development of knowledge and practical skills, which will assist young people in establishing a healthy relationship with food throughout their life.

Units included in this course provide a balance between theoretical understandings and practical capabilities. The course recognises the importance of a practical approach to solving everyday life problems and provides students with the opportunity to develop management skills involved in the selection and manipulation of resources.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Food First

Unit 2: Nutrition for Life

Unit 3: Food and Culture in Australia

Unit 4: Independent Living

Furniture Construction A/V/M

This course promotes skills and knowledge for further training in the Furniture or Construction industry trades, including, Cabinet Making, Carpentry, Formwork, Antique Restoration, Picture Framing, Wood Machining, Glass and Glazing and Musical Instrument construction. This course is structured to lead to the VET qualification Certificate I in Furnishing.

The course allows students to develop industry knowledge, skills and understanding while engaged in hands-on creative projects using current industrial manufacturing processes and Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) technology. Through working in a simulated workplace environment students are prepared for entry level employment into an apprenticeship or traineeship.

Sample Unit pattern:

Unit 1: Furniture & Timber: Fundamentals

Unit 2: Furniture & Timber: Industrial Skills

Unit 3: Furniture & Timber: Project

Unit 4: Furniture & Timber: Timber Joints

Global Studies A/T (new in 2018)

Global Studies is the study of political, economic, social and cultural relationships of the world. The course content encourages global perspective and provides students with the background to study other cultures in relation to their own, including concepts of identity and belonging. This interdisciplinary course explores global issues, global communities, global challenges and change.

The Global Studies course teaches students to think critically about key global issues and to develop an understanding of international politics, global economic forces, intercultural relationships, international cooperation, and global citizenship. This course complements the proliferation of interdisciplinary courses in prominent universities in Australia and around the world.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Big Ideas & You

Unit 2: Australia: Our Democracy, Your Choice

Unit 3: International Relations

Unit 4: Global Challenges

History - Ancient A/T/M

The Ancient History curriculum enables students to study life in early civilisations based on the analysis and interpretation of physical and written remains. The ancient period, as defined in this curriculum, extends from the development of early human communities to the end of late antiquity AD 650, with a particular focus on the ancient societies of Europe, the Near East and Asia.

Hawker College students reconstruct the past using evidence from a range of literary, documentary, architectural and archaeological sources, and develop skills associated with the analysis and evaluation of historical sources. Students enjoy opportunities to join excursions to the National Library, the ANU Classics Museum and Sydney University’s Nicholson Museum. Students may specialise in a particular course or may ‘mix and match’ units to suit their interests. No previous study of History is required.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Investigating the Ancient Worlds

This unit involves an investigation of how the ancient world has been represented. This involves an exploration of the remaining sources and how they have been interpreted. This unit focuses on issues relevant to the investigation of the ancient world and builds on the historical skills developed in the Foundation to Year 10 curriculum to develop an introduction to historiography. Students will study at least TWO issues related to evidence including the authentication, preservation, ownership and/or display of material from the ancient world. Students also study how evidence has been used in interpretations and representations of ONE ancient site, event or change, individual or group through to modern times.

This study provides an opportunity to explore key artifacts, events, legends, personalities and controversies of the ancient world, focusing on an analysis and evaluation of the differing ways in which they have been interpreted and represented from ancient to modern times. Students investigate the past through an examination of issues relevant to the nature of the evidence including the ethical practice, ownership and representation of the ancient world. The key conceptual understandings of this unit include: the reliability and usefulness of sources, custodianship of the past, interpretations and representations.

Unit 2: Ancient Societies

This unit involves an investigation of how people lived in the ancient world through an examination of the evidence of the social, political and economic institutions and structures of TWO societies. Students will also study ONE significant feature of society and how it relates to the institutions and structures studied. The significant feature may be the same for the two societies and teachers may choose to conduct a comparative study of this significant feature across the two societies.

Students are required to make connections between the social, economic and political elements of the society and the specific feature they study. In this unit there is a focus on analytical skills, which require identification and evaluation of a variety of ancient and modern sources for the society. The key conceptual understandings of this unit include: reliability and usefulness of sources, significance, perspectives and interpretations.

Unit 3: People Power & Authority

This unit involves an investigation of ONE ancient society across a broad historical period, with a particular emphasis on the nature and exercise of power and authority in that society. Students also study ONE individual who had a significant impact on their times, either within the chosen society or another society. This unit requires a greater focus on a range of written source material and an evaluation of the significance of the selected individual.

Students examine the nature of power and authority in the society and the ways in which it was demonstrated through political, military, religious and economic features. This study requires a focus on the reasons for continuity and change. The detailed study of an individual who had a significant impact on their times develops students’ understanding of the importance of human agency, as demonstrated by the possible motivations and actions of individuals. Students develop their skills of historical analysis with an emphasis on the identification and evaluation of different perspectives and interpretations of the past and on an understanding of the issue of contestability in history. The key conceptual understandings of this unit include: causation, change and continuity, perspectives, interpretations and contestability.

Unit 4: Reconstruct the Ancient World

This unit involves an investigation of a significant historical period through an analysis of relevant archaeological and written sources. Students will examine how these sources have been used to construct an understanding of the relevant social, political, religious and economic institutions and practices, and key events and individuals of the historical period.

This unit allows for greater study of historiography and the challenges associated with the interpretation and evaluation of the evidence. Students will analyse the reliability and usefulness of a wide range of sources and the contribution of new research and scholarship to the reconstruction of the historical period. The unit enables students to develop their understanding of changing interpretations over time and appreciate the contestable nature of history and the value of the ancient past.

The key conceptual understandings of this unit include: usefulness and reliability of sources, perspectives, interpretations, contestability, reconstruction and conservation.

History - Pre-Modern A/T/M

The Pre-Modern History curriculum enables students to study life in the pre-modern period based on the analysis and interpretation of physical and written remains. The pre-modern period, as defined in this curriculum, is global in scope and covers the period c. 400-1750 CE.

Hawker College students can choose from many diverse cultures from the end of ancient times to the beginnings of the modern world - including ‘medieval’ history on a global scale.  This course allows for fascinating comparisons of societies undergoing historical change, such as transformations caused by Vikings, golden ages of Elizabethan England and Renaissance Florence, conflict in Japan and Peru, and power in France and Prussia.  All students are welcome, including those who have not previously specialised in History.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Transformation

The unit provides an introduction to the pre modern world. It looks at the factors that transformed societies in this period. It also explores the problematic and contestable nature of the evidence, both written and archaeological, that has survived. The fragmented nature of the evidence requires students to develop techniques for analysing historical silences. In addition, students will investigate the contested nature of interpretations and representations of this evidence. This unit focuses on issues relevant to the investigation of the pre modern world and builds on the historical skills developed in the Foundation to Year 10 curriculum to develop an introduction to historiography.

The unit provides an opportunity to select ONE or TWO of the electives listed with a close study of at least ONE of the topics in each. It is strongly advised that, in order to reach appropriate depth, teachers select no more than THREE topics in total.

Unit 2: Golden Ages

This unit examines the role of individuals and personalities in historical causation and compares this to social structural theories. Students will undertake two case studies in which they explore the role of a great person within the ‘golden age’ in which they lived.
Students will examine the notion of a Golden Age, and the role of a great people within that age, with particular reference to political, economic, social, artistic and cultural developments. They will ask questions such as:

* For whom this was a Golden Age?
* To what degree Golden Age is a suitable term to describe the lives of ordinary people?
* To what extent can a ‘great person’ claim the creation of a Golden Age?
* To what extent is our perception of a Golden Age shaped by the surviving sources?

For the standard (1.0) unit, students study TWO of the following electives, which are to be taught with the requisite historical content described below. For the half standard (0.5) unit, students study ONE of the electives, which are to be taught with the prescribed historical content prescribed for this unit and considering the historical issues suggested for the elective

Unit 3: Conflict

This unit examines the interaction of societies in the pre modern period and the impact that they have on one another. The approach taken by this unit is comparative in that it explores different perspectives of the same events. This will include interrogating different perspectives through source material and examining its origins, purposes, values and limitations.

Students will also investigate archaeological sources and develop techniques for interpreting and understanding historical material other than the written word. Further, the fragmented nature of the evidence requires students to develop techniques for analysing historical silences and the way that these have shaped the cultural narrative.
This unit will explore the complexities of contact between groups of people and the adaptations, confrontations, benefits, relationships, or violence that might result.

For a standard (1.0) unit students will study TWO of the following electives using the historical content set out below. For the half standard (0.5) unit students will study ONE of the following electives using the historical content set out below.

Unit 4: Power

This unit examines the nature and exercise of power and authority in pre modern societies. Students will analyse structures, loci and relations of power to understand their varied and complex nature.  In order to do this they will draw upon historical concepts such as: Gender Theory, Marxism, Modernism/ Positivism, Post-modernism, Post-colonialism, Subaltern Studies, Orientalism and the way that these theories shape historical viewpoints. This type of analysis requires students to engage with scholarly and historiographical debate.

For a standard (1.0) unit, students will study ONE or more of the following electives. For a half standard (0.5) unit students will study at least ONE, possibly more of the following electives using the historical content set out below.

History -  Modern A/T/M

The Modern History curriculum enables students to study the forces that have shaped today’s world and provides them with a broader and deeper comprehension of the world in which they live. While the focus is on the 20th century, the curriculum refers back to formative changes from the late 18th century onwards and encourages students to make connections with the changing world of the 21st century.

Hawker College students can deepen their knowledge about world-changing events in modern times, with a huge range of topics to choose from.  For example, they can start with revolutions in France and America, move on to explore the women’s movement in Britain and Australia, focusing next on modern Japan or Germany, before looking at conflict in the Middle East and the Cold War.  All students are welcome, including those who have not previously specialised in History.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Understanding the Modern World

This unit examines developments of significance in the modern era, including the ideas that inspired them and their far-reaching consequences. Students examine TWO topics, including at least ONE study of a development or turning point that has helped to define the modern world.

Students explore crucial changes for example the application of reason to human affairs; the transformation of production, consumption, transport and communications; the challenge to social hierarchy and hereditary privilege, and the assertion of inalienable rights; and the new principles of government by consent. Through their studies, students explore the nature of the sources for the study of Modern History and build their skills in historical method through inquiry. The key conceptual understandings covered in this unit are: what makes an historical development significant; the changing nature and usefulness of sources; the changing representations and interpretations of the past; and the historical legacy of these developments for the Western world and beyond.

Unit 2: Change in the 20th Century

This unit examines significant movements for change in the 20th century that led to change in society, including people’s attitudes and circumstances. These movements draw on the major ideas described in Unit 1, have been closely connected with democratic political systems, and have been subject to political debate. Through a detailed examination of TWO major 20th century movements, students investigate the ways in which individuals, groups and institutions have challenged existing political structures, accepted social organisation, and prevailing economic models to transform societies. The key conceptual understandings covered in this unit are: the factors leading to the development of movements; the methods adopted to achieve effective change; the changing nature of these movements throughout the 20th century; and changing perspectives of the value of these movements and how their significance is interpreted.

Unit 3: Modern Nations in the 20th Century

This unit examines the characteristics of modern nations in the 20th century; the crises that confronted nations, their responses to these crises and the different paths nations have taken to fulfil their goals. Students study the characteristics of TWO nations, including ONE from List 1 and ONE from List 2. In their study of a List 1 nation, students investigate crises that challenged the stability of government. In their study of a List 2 nation, students study the path of development that was taken and the social, economic and political order that was established. In their study of both nations, students examine the ways in which the nations dealt with internal divisions and external threats. They emerge with a deeper understanding of the character of modern nations. The key conceptual understandings covered in this unit are the reliability and usefulness of evidence; cause and effect; change and continuity; significance; empathy; contestability; and changing representations and interpretations.

Unit 4: The Modern World since 1945

This unit examines some significant and distinctive features of the modern world within the period 1945 – 2010, in order to build students’ understanding of the contemporary world - that is, why we are here at this point in time. These include changes to the nature of the world order: shifting international tensions, alliances and power blocs; the emergence of Asia as a significant international political and economic force and the nature of engagement by and with Australia; the nature of various conflicts and regional and international attempts to create peace and security; and the implications of globalisation with the ever-increasing mobility of people, the growth of the global economy and overall rise in living standards. Students study ONE of these features. As part of their study, they should follow and make relevant connections with contemporary events. The key conceptual understandings covered in this unit are: causation; change and continuity; historical significance and changing representations and interpretations of the past, and contestability.

Hospitality Industry Fundamentals C Service/Kitchen

Hawker College students will progress towards competency based qualifications aimed at high end and intermediate technical food preparation skills for restaurants and catering as well as routine skills for the fast food sector. The hospitality industry contributes significantly to the Australian economy and employs a large number of people incorporating a wide variety of related skills sets. The industry offers full and part-time employment opportunities that encompass flexible working hours making it particularly attractive to young people as a second job.

All are examples of possible employment destinations for young people with hospitality qualifications which has been identified as a national skills shortage area.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Hygienic Practices

Unit 2: Safe Work Practices

Unit 3: Food Preparation Equipment

Unit 4: Customer Information and Assistance

Hospitality  C Cafe Culture & Cafe Operations

Students can progress toward Hospitality Industry qualifications that will give them employable skills such as coffee making and cafe food service. This course provides students with opportunities that promote an appreciation and understanding of industry workplace culture and practices.

Hawker College students will learn hospitality industry attributes such as self-reliance, personal responsibility for the safety, health, and well-being of others, contribution to teamwork, effective time management and targeted technical skills.  This course supports the development of these attributes in students and contributes to both life and employability skills for the domestic and international employment market.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Interact with Customers

Unit 2: Coffee

Unit 3: Financial Transactions

Unit 4: Hospitality Skills

Hospitality V/C Retail Bakery & Patisserie (2018)

Skills and qualifications in Retail Baking and Patisserie have been identified on the ACT Skills Needs List as required to fill employment gaps in these areas. Students undertaking these courses will build on and supplement existing Certificate 1 & 2 in Hospitality.

Hawker College students wishing to build on skills acquired through Certificates 1& 2 in Hospitality may wish to expand their knowledge and attain specialised qualifications in these sought after areas. Students will have access to Hawker’s specialised equipment and teaching staff. Students interested in this course stream will need to demonstrate suitability through an interview with teaching staff.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Certificate II Retail Baking Assistance

Unit 2: Certificate III Retail Baking (combined)

Unit 3: Certificate III Retail Baking

Unit 4: Certificate III Patisserie

Information Technology A/T/M Applications Stream

Students learn industry standard practices in digital media graphics &, animation, website design & construction on industry standard tools to solve problems that are both meaningful and interesting for the student. Learning starts with a technical problem that students will solve and then engage in the design and development of practical solutions to centre their learning and help provide direction and focus.

By studying the impacts of Interaction and Experience Design on a range of technical design disciplines Information Technology Applications provides the core skills that students will need to participate and create solutions for a rapidly changing technological world. Information Technology Application uses a problem solving methodology of learning that helps build strong critical analysis, design, evaluation, and development skills.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Digital Media Foundations

Unit 2:  Digital Media Graphics and Animation

Unit 3: Website Design

Unit 4: Dynamic Website Construction

Information Technology A/T/M Game Design Stream

Students will develop skills to conceive, design, build, and release interactive systems for games and simulations. Game Design students will learn how to produce complex systems, manage timeframes, manipulate control sequences and programming environments, the creation of graphical representations, the use of multimedia effects such as sound, and project completion aspects such as marketing, selling, and legal considerations.

Students will learn the complete development lifecycle on how to create digital and interactive worlds. Students will be engaged with conceiving, designing, and developing, both classical games but also participate in modern simulations systems found in architecture, engineering, flight, and military systems.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Computer Game Programming and Design

Unit 2: 3D modelling, animation, and texturing

Unit 3: Portable Games Programming

Unit 4:.Project Development

Information Technology A/T/M Programming Stream

Programming provides opportunities for students to learn practical and meaningful skills through the application of modern Computer Science / Software Engineering fields such as Ubiquitous Computing, Intelligent Systems, Computer Vision, and Physical Computing. The course meets the needs of students who have a general interest in technology as well as future software developers.

Programming at Hawker is focused on teaching the skills required for young people to help create the future. Students will be provided with challenges to conceive, design, and develop meaningful and creative solutions to interesting real world problems.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Foundation Programming

Unit 2: Microcontrollers

Unit 3: Intermediate Programming

Unit 4: Robotics and Intelligent Systems

Integrated Science A/T/M (currently under review to replace Senior Science )

The study of Integrated Science encourages and enables students to develop an understanding of the universe through observation, questioning, experimentation, discussion, critical analysis and creative thinking.

Hawker College students will explore fundamental aspects of the most of the core sciences through a series of themed units. The course is intended for students who are NOT pursuing a career in one of the major Sciences, but rather students who may have an interest in a variety of natural phenomena or those students wishing to follow a career were some knowledge of scientific methods and concepts would an advantage ( e.g. Primary Teaching, Nursing , Electrical trades etc.)

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Biological Senior Science

The electives in this unit have a biological focus.

Unit 2: Environmental Senior Science

The electives in this unit have an earth and environmental focus.

Unit 3: Chemical Senior Science

The electives in this unit have a chemistry focus.

Unit 4:  Physical Senior Science

The electives in this unit have a physics focus.

Legal Studies A/T/M

Students will explore the law, its institutions and processes, in a social, economic and political context. They will seek to develop their knowledge of how legal processes impact the lives of citizens and to evaluate the effectiveness of laws and consider opportunities for reform.

Students choosing Legal Studies will be provided with opportunities to explore legal principles such as justice, fairness and equality. Learners will examine both criminal and civil law and also become familiar with the nature of human rights. Students will have the opportunity to select current legal issues to study in depth. They are encouraged to become active and informed citizens and there are many opportunities for further involvement such as participation in Mock Trial Competitions, visits to the ACT Courts, Debating and the Constitutional Convention.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1:  Civil Law and Dispute Resolution

In this unit, students study the rights and responsibilities that exists between individuals, groups and organisations and the resolution of civil disputes through courts and other mechanisms. Through the use of a range of contemporary examples, students investigate civil law, processes and institutions, and develop an appreciation of the role of civil law in society.

Unit 2:  Crime, Justice and Legal System

In this unit, students study the complexity and limitations of the criminal justice system in achieving justice. Through the use of a range of contemporary examples, students investigate criminal law, processes and institutions and the tension between community interests and individual rights and freedoms.

Unit 3: Negotiated Study (Family and Property Law)

A negotiated study unit has an important place in senior secondary courses.  It is a valuable pedagogical approach that empowers students to make decisions about their own learning.  A negotiated study unit is decided upon by a class, group(s) or individual student in consultation with the teacher and with the principal’s approval. The program of learning for a negotiated study unit must meet all the content descriptions as appears in the unit.

This unit is a negotiated investigation of a contemporary legal studies  issue. This study may  be an extension of previously studied topics; a research unit, cover electives not previously studied or may be from the broader field ofLegal Studies. Students engaging in the unit will address the content descriptions and assessment criteria.

There must be procedures and documentation that clearly outline decisions made as a result of the negotiation process.  It is expected that decisions would be agreed within two weeks of the commencement of a unit of work and be published in the Unit Outline (Refer to section 4.3.6.1 Unit Outline).  This then becomes the document from which students and teacher operate for that unit.  Any further negotiation would be of a minor kind e.g. due dates of assessment tasks.

Unit 4: Law, Government and Society

In this unit, students study legal rights and responsibilities in everyday life from different political, economic and social perspectives. Through the use of a range of contemporary examples, students investigate how the law attempts to balance the rights and responsibilities of the individual with the best interests of the wider community.

Literature T

Literature fosters an appreciation for the power of language through study of literary texts, and develops students as independent, innovative and creative learners and thinkers. Students explore how literary texts from the past and present, from Australia and other cultures, shape our perceptions of the world. They actively participate in detailed evidence-based literary analysis and in the creation of imaginative texts, inquiring into the relationships between authors, audiences, contexts, attitudes and values.

Literature is a course best suited to strong students of English who are keen readers, with a genuine interest in the examination of complex, challenging literary texts. It allows those students interested in pursuing literary studies beyond college to establish a foundational knowledge and skills for undergraduate work.Literature can be combined with English T in a major, or to achieve a major minor or double major.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Ways of Reading and Creating

Unit 1 develops students’ knowledge and understanding of different ways of reading and creating literary texts drawn from a widening range of historical, social, cultural and personal contexts. Students analyse the relationships between language, text, contexts, individual points of view and response. This unit develops knowledge and understanding of different literary conventions and storytelling traditions and their relationships with audiences. A range of literary forms is considered in fiction and non-fiction texts; for example, oral, written, multimodal, verse, prose and film. The significance of ideas and the distinctive qualities of texts are analysed through detailed textual study. Through the creation of analytical responses, students frame consistent arguments that are substantiated by relevant evidence. In the creation of imaginative texts, students explore and experiment with aspects of style and form.

Unit 2: Intertextuality

Unit 2 develops student knowledge and understanding of the ways literary texts connect with each other. Drawing on a range of language and literary experiences, students consider the relationships between texts, genres, authors, audiences and contexts. Ideas, language and structure of different texts are compared and contrasted. Connections between texts are established by analysing their similarities and differences, for example, through intertextuality and other patterns and allusions evident in ideas, language used and forms of texts. Students create analytical responses that are evidence-based and convincing. By experimenting with text structures and language features, students understand how imaginative texts are informed by analytical responses

Unit 3: Power of Literature

Unit 3 develops students’ knowledge and understanding of the relationship between language, culture and identity in literary texts. Students inquire into the power of language to represent ideas, events and people, comparing these across a range of texts, contexts, modes and forms. Through critical analysis and evaluation, the values and attitudes represented in and through texts and their impact on the reader are examined. Throughout the unit, students create analytical responses that are characterised by personal voice and informed observation. In creating imaginative texts, students experiment with language, adapt forms, and challenge conventions and ideas.

Unit 4: Literary Interpretations

Unit 4 develops students’ appreciation of the significance of literary study through close critical analysis of literary texts drawn from a range of forms, genres and styles. Students reflect upon the creative use of language, and the structural and stylistic features that shape meaning and influence response. The unit focuses on the dynamic nature of literary interpretation and considers the insights texts offer, their literary conventions and aesthetic appeal. Analytical responses demonstrate increasing independence in interpreting texts and synthesising a range of perspectives into critical and imaginative responses. In creating imaginative texts, students experiment with literary conventions and reflect on how the created text takes into account the expectations of audiences.

Mathematics - Essential A/M

This course focuses on using mathematics effectively, efficiently and critically to make informed decisions. It provides students with the mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding to solve problems in real contexts for a range of workplace, personal, further learning and community settings. This subject provides the opportunity for students to prepare for post-school options of employment and further training.

Essential Mathematics will enable students to use mathematics effectively, efficiently and critically to make informed decisions in their daily lives. For example, familiarity with the concept of a rate enables students to solve a wide range of practical problems, such as fuel consumption, travel times, interest payments, taxation, and population growth.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Rates, Measurement, Algebra, Graphs

Unit 2: Data Presentation, Percentages, Time and Motion

Unit 3: Measurement, Plans and Models, Graphs, data

Unit 4: Probability, Earth Geometry, Loan and Interest

Mathematical Applications T

This course is designed for those students who want to extend their mathematical skills beyond Year 10 level but whose future studies or employment pathways do not require knowledge of calculus. The subject is designed for students who have a wide range of educational and employment aspirations, including continuing their studies at university or TAFE.

Mathematical Applications focuses on the use of mathematics to solve problems in contexts that involve financial modelling, geometric and trigonometric analysis, graphical and network analysis, and growth and decay in sequences. It also provides opportunities for students to develop systematic strategies based on the statistical investigation process for answering statistical questions that involve analysing univariate and bivariate data, including time series data.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Finance, Algebra and Measurement

This unit has three topics: ‘Consumer arithmetic’, ‘Algebra and matrices’, and ‘Shape and measurement’.

‘Consumer arithmetic’ reviews the concepts of rate and percentage change in the context of earning and managing money, and provides a fertile ground for the use of spreadsheets.

‘Algebra and matrices’ continues the F-10 study of algebra and introduces the new topic of matrices.

‘Shape and measurement’ builds on and extends the knowledge and skills students developed in the F-10 curriculum with the concept of similarity and associated calculations involving simple and compound geometric shapes. The emphasis in this topic is on applying these skills in a range of practical contexts, including those involving three-dimensional shapes.

Classroom access to the technology necessary to support the computational aspects of the topics in this unit is assumed.

Unit 2: Statistics, Applications of Trigonometry, Linear Equations

Unit 3: Bivariate Data Analysis, Growth and Decay, Networks

This unit has three topics: ‘Bivariate data analysis’, ‘Growth and decay in sequences’ and ‘Graphs and networks’.

‘Bivariate data analysis’ introduces students to some methods for identifying, analysing and describing associations between pairs of variables, including the use of the least-squares method as a tool for modelling and analysing linear associations. The content is to be taught within the framework of the statistical investigation process.

‘Growth and decay in sequences’ employs recursion to generate sequences that can be used to model and investigate patterns of growth and decay in discrete situations. These sequences find application in a wide range of practical situations, including modelling the growth of a compound interest investment, the growth of a bacterial population, or the decrease in the value of a car over time. Sequences are also essential to understanding the patterns of growth and decay in loans and investments that are studied in detail in Unit 4.

‘Graphs and networks’ introduces students to the language of graphs and the ways in which graphs, represented as a collection of points and interconnecting lines, can be used to model and analyse everyday situations such as a rail or social network.

Classroom access to technology to support the graphical and computational aspects of these topics is assumed.

Unit 4: Time Series Analysis, Loans and Investments, Decision Mathematics

This unit has three topics: ‘Time series analysis’; ‘ Loans, investments and annuities’ and ‘Networks and decision mathematics’.

‘Time series analysis’ continues students’ study of statistics by introducing them to the concepts and techniques of time series analysis. The content is to be taught within the framework of the statistical investigation process.

‘Loans, investments and annuities’ aims to provide students with sufficient knowledge of financial mathematics to solve practical problems associated with taking out or refinancing a mortgage and making investments.

‘Networks and decision mathematics’ uses networks to model and aid decision making in practical situations.

Classroom access to the technology necessary to support the graphical, computational and statistical aspects of this unit is assumed.

Mathematical Methods T

The major themes of this course are calculus and statistics. They are developed systematically, with increasing levels of sophistication and complexity. Mathematical Methods is designed for students whose future pathways may involve mathematics and statistics and their applications in a range of disciplines at the tertiary level.

This course provides a foundation for further studies in disciplines in which the mathematics of calculus and statistics have important roles. It is also advantageous for further studies in the health and social sciences.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Functions, Trigonometry, Counting and Probability

Unit 2: Exponential Functions, Sequences and Series, Differential Calculus

Unit 3: Calculus and its Applications, Discrete Random Variables

Unit 4: Logarithmic Functions, Continuous Distribution, Interval Estimates

Specialist Mathematics T

This course has been designed to be taken in conjunction with Specialist Methods. Specialist Mathematics is designed for students with a strong interest in mathematics, including those intending to study mathematics, statistics, all sciences and associated fields, economics or engineering at university.

Students of Specialist Mathematics will be able to appreciate the true nature of mathematics, its beauty and its functionality. There is a sound logical basis to this course, and in mastering the subject students will develop logical reasoning skills to a high level.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Combinatorics, Vectors, Geometry

Unit 1 of Specialist Mathematics contains three topics – ‘Combinatorics’, ‘Vectors in the plane’ and ‘Geometry’ – that complement the content of Mathematical Methods. The proficiency strand, Reasoning, of the F–10 curriculum is continued explicitly in ‘Geometry’ through a discussion of developing mathematical arguments. While these ideas are illustrated through deductive Euclidean geometry in this topic, they recur throughout all of the topics in Specialist Mathematics. ‘Geometry’ also provides the opportunity to summarise and extend students’ studies in Euclidean Geometry. An understanding of this topic is of great benefit in the study of later topics in the course, including vectors and complex numbers.

‘Vectors in the plane’ provides new perspectives for working with two-dimensional space, and serves as an introduction to techniques that will be extended to three-dimensional space in Unit 3.

‘Combinatorics’ provides techniques that are useful in many areas of mathematics including probability and algebra. All these topics develop students’ ability to construct mathematical arguments.

These three topics considerably broaden students’ mathematical experience and therefore begin an awakening to the breadth and utility of the subject. They also enable students to increase their mathematical flexibility and versatility.

Access to technology to support the computational aspects of these topics is assumed.

Unit 2: Trigonometry, Matrices, Complex Numbers

Unit 2 of Specialist Mathematics contains three topics – ‘Trigonometry’, ‘Real and complex numbers’ and ‘Matrices’…‘Trigonometry’ contains techniques that are used in other topics in both this unit and Unit 3. ‘Real and complex numbers’ provides a continuation of students’ study of numbers, and the study of complex numbers is continued in Unit 3. This topic also contains a section on proof by mathematical induction. The study of matrices is undertaken, including applications to linear transformations of the plane.

Access to technology to support the computational aspects of these topics is assumed.

Unit 3: Complex Numbers, Functions, Vectors in 3D

Unit 3 of Specialist Mathematics contains three topics: ‘Vectors in three dimensions’, ‘Complex numbers’ and ‘Functions and sketching graphs’. The study of vectors was introduced in Unit 1 with a focus on vectors in two-dimensional space. In this unit, three-dimensional vectors are studied and vector equations and vector calculus are introduced, with the latter extending students’ knowledge of calculus from Mathematical Methods. Cartesian and vector equations, together with equations of planes, enables students to solve geometric problems and to solve problems involving motion in three-dimensional space. The Cartesian form of complex numbers was introduced in Unit 2, and the study of complex numbers is now extended to the polar form. The study of functions and techniques of graph sketching, begun in Mathematical Methods, is extended and applied in sketching graphs and solving problems involving integration.

Access to technology to support the computational aspects of these topics is assumed.

Unit 4: Integral Calculus, Rates of Change, Differential Equations, Statistical Inference

Unit 4 of Specialist Mathematics contains three topics: ‘Integration and applications of integration’, ‘Rates of change and differential equations’ and ‘Statistical inference’. In Unit 4, the study of differentiation and integration of functions continues, and the calculus techniques developed in this and previous topics are applied to simple differential equations, in particular in biology and kinematics. These topics demonstrate the real-world applications of the mathematics learned throughout Specialist Mathematics. In this unit all of the students’ previous experience working with probability and statistics is drawn together in the study of statistical inference for the distribution of sample means and confidence intervals for sample means.

Access to technology to support the computational aspects of these topics is assumed.

Media A/T/M

Media is the study of communication. The Media course involves making and responding to a variety of media texts. Students learn by making media products that communicate to audiences and by responding critically to media products. Students learn about media codes and conventions, representation, workflow end-to-end production, technology and the production process, to engage an audience.

Media students develop skills in written and oral communication as well as production skills in a range of media.  Hawker College Media students have access to a range of production equipment including Adobe Suite, cameras, audio equipment, radio room, green screen and multimedia formats.  The course suits students who are interested in media, journalism, film making, photography, events management, advertising and public relations.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Media Foundation, Documentary, Film Genres, Animation

Unit 2: TV, History & Development of Film, Journalism

Unit 3: Popular Culture, Video Production, Audio Communication

Unit 4: Process to Production, Media Project & Scriptwriting, Radio, Public Communication

Metal Engineering A

This course provides opportunities for students to develop relevant technical and interpersonal skills suitable for employment or further training.  It meets the needs of students who have a general interest in metal fabrication as well as those intending to choose a career pathway into traditional trades and related service industries.

This course has a high practical content with students learning through a number of ‘hands on’ tasks. It is suitable for any student who is interested in metal fabrication, machining, casting and sculpture. The course has scope to meet the needs of those who wish to pursue a trade or those who would like to learn to work with metal for pleasure. As the students develop their skills they have the opportunity to work on projects of their own choice.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Introduction to the Metal Industry

Unit 2: Metal Trade Skills

Unit 3: Metal Skills and Processes

Unit 4 :Working in the Metal Industry

Music A/T

Students explore a diverse range of music styles through performance, composition and musicology. Students are provided with a variety of stimulating performance opportunities throughout the year. Hawker College has a school band and a focus on performing, song writing and audio production in contemporary styles.

This course caters for all levels of musical ability. Research has proven the many social, physical and intellectual benefits of a music education. Music has a wide range of real-life applications from performance and community involvement to audio technician skills for live and studio performance. Tertiary pathways may be vocational and music overall adds to a well-rounded tertiary package for university entrance.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Music in Media

Unit 2: Introduction to Jazz

Unit 3: Contemporary Music of the 90s and Beyond

Unit 4: Self-directed Studies in Music

Outdoor Education A/T

Outdoor Education is an area of study that actively engages students in intellectual, social, emotional and physical learning through recreational and sporting activities. Students can undertake camps and courses in surfing, wilderness expeditions, alpine skiing and snowboarding and SCUBA diving.

Outdoor Education at Hawker College focuses on building new relationships, working as a team, and participating in a variety of practical activities that develop students as leaders.  This course offers exciting experiences for students to build on their confidence and skills.   Students have the opportunity to step outside their comfort zones and face challenges in an outdoors environment.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Surfing

Unit 2: Snorkeling

Unit 3: Alpine Skiing and Snowboarding

Unit 4: Canyoning

Scuba Diving

Term 1, Year 11 & 12 - Unit 1: Open Water Scuba Diving

Term 2, Year 11 & 12 - Unit 2: Advanced Open Water

Term 3, Year 11 & 12 - Unit 3: Marine Expedition - Overseas Excursion

Scuba Diving at Hawker College is an amazing opportunity for students to experience the underwater world and gain a worldwide recognised PADI dive qualification. Students, once qualified, have the opportunity to take part in the overseas marine Expedition to Fiji or Vanuatu.  This is a great way for students to experience another culture and their communities and most of all the fantastic dive locations and sea life.

Photography A/T/M

Images are the language of photography, and are used to represent, question and communicate concepts and ideas. The study of photography enables students to experience photography as producers and as audience members.

Students who are considering further study in the Photography, Visual Arts, Design, Architecture, Web Design, Media and Education should consider either the Tertiary or Accredited course in Digital Photography. More broadly these courses can help students learn about their camera and how to take photos for travel, wedding and general interest. The study of Photography equips students with life skills whilst also providing continuity with many tertiary and industry courses.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Digital Photography

Unit 2: Digital Photographic Practice

Unit 3: Contemporary Photography

Unit 4:.Art Photography

Physical Education A/M

This course is designed for students with an interest in physical activity, personal fitness, sport and recreation. A mainly practical course, that also caters for students who would like to gain coaching accreditation or learn how to organise and manage various competitions. It is a suitable foundation for students considering various fitness and recreation courses at CIT.

The course aims to build your self-confidence and develop skills and attitudes, which may lead to sustained interest in leisure activities in post college years.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Fitness and Football Codes

Unit 2: Racquet and Team Sports

Unit 3: Recreation and Throwing Sports

Unit 4: Modified Games and Sport Competitions

Physics T

Physics is a fundamental science that endeavours to explain all the natural phenomena that occur in the universe. Its power lies in the use of a comparatively small number of assumptions, models, laws and theories to explain a wide range of phenomena, from the incredibly small to the incredibly large. .

Hawker College students will develop skills in problem solving and analytical thinking as they explore the content of this course.  Practical work will emphasise the application of theory to solve extended, open ended tasks. Well-developed skills in algebra are highly recommended for students considering this course.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Linear Motion and Waves

Unit 3: Gravity and Electromagnetism

Unit 2: Thermal, Nuclear and Electrical

Unit 4: Revolutions in Modern Physics

Psychology A/T/M

Psychology is the scientific study of how individuals and groups think, feel and behave. It gives students a better understanding of themselves and others. The study of psychology is useful for most career paths: medicine, human resources, academia, business, marketing, defence forces, social and community work. The Study of Psychology at Tertiary level is helpful for further Tertiary studies in the area.

Hawker College students will understand how individuals think, feel and act within different contexts. Such knowledge has the potential to empower and enhance individual abilities and facilitate awareness of the human condition, along with tolerance and respect for others.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Psychology in Society

This unit examines the role of psychology in society. Students examine at least two electives for the semester to explain how humans think act and feel in a social setting. Students explore the assumptions, applications and limitations of psychological research and literature related to psychology in society. Through their studies, students explore how individual perceptions and interaction influence social relationships. The key conceptual understandings covered in this unit are: attitudes, prejudice, forensic psychology, human relationships, organisational psychology and social influences.

Unit 2: Individual Differences

This unit examines individual differences in human cognition and behaviour. Students examine at least two electives for the semester to explain individual human behaviour as an outcome of influences and interactions. Students explore the assumptions, applications and limitations of psychological research and literature related to individual differences. Through their studies, students explore the nature of the individual and how these differences relate to society. The key conceptual understandings covered in this unit are: differences in mental abilities and intelligence, personality, development, learning and motivation.

Unit 3: Into the Mind

This unit examines the biological basis of human cognition and behaviour. Students examine at least two electives for the semester to explain how individuals respond to the environment as an outcome of biological influences and interactions. Students explore the assumptions, applications and limitations of psychological research and literature related to the biological basis of behaviour. Through their studies, students explore how heredity, environmental and biological factors influence behaviour. The key conceptual understandings covered in this unit are: sensation and perception, consciousness, memory, emotion and neuroscience.

Unit 4: Psychology of Wellness

This unit examines the factors that influence physical and mental wellbeing. Students examine at least two electives for the semester to explain how health can be positively and negatively affected by biological and environmental influences and interactions. Students explore the assumptions, applications and limitations of psychological research and literature related to the psychology of wellness. Through their studies, students explore how heredity, environmental and biological factors influence physical and mental wellbeing. The key conceptual understandings covered in this unit are: positive psychology, mental health, stress, resilience and coping and human relationships.

Sport, Recreation and Leadership A/M/V

This course focuses on the significance that the Sports and Recreation Industry has in the life of individuals and communities. It is a subject that provides students with the opportunities to learn through health and wellbeing activities.

Sports, Recreation & Leadership can make an important contribution to enhancing students’ opportunities for employment, enterprise, further study, leisure and lifelong learning. It provides a unique opportunity for students to experience the challenge and fun of active participation in physical activity.  Students will have the opportunity to work within our local primary and high schools, as coaches and leaders and provide a variety of sporting clinics and carnivals.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Sport & Recreation Industry

Unit 2: Sports Coaching & Management

Unit 3: Community Activities & Events

Unit 4: Active Lifestyles & Sports Leadership

Textiles and Fashion A/T

Fashion and Textiles is a broad and evolving area of study that reflects the important and varied roles that textiles play in industry and broader society. This field is a multidisciplinary study that draws on concepts and skills underpinning design, technology, markets, culture, environmental sustainability, ethical issues and relevant skills for employment in the textiles and fashion industries.

This course covers aspects of the fashion industry such as development of design elements, construction techniques, fabric analysis, fashion trends, marketing and manufacturing a collection of garments according to a design brief. Some sewing skills are an advantage but not a prerequisite for this course.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Working with Textiles

Unit 2: Marketing and Designer Labels

Unit 3: Design Applications

Unit 4 :Fashion Industry

Tourism and Event Management A/T/M/V

Students studying Tourism and Event Management gain an appreciation and understanding of the workplace culture and practices of the tourism and hospitality industry

Tourism and Event Management can lead to career opportunities across a range of industries. Workplaces for which tourism and hospitality competencies are required include hotels, clubs, restaurants, community food service organisations, catering organisations, resorts, as well as travel and tourism organisations and government departments.  Student will have the opportunity to visit a variety of tourist locations around Canberra and Australia.  Students will promote Hawker College and assist with special events and activities.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Tourism and Event Management

Unit 2: Global Tourism

Unit 3: Working in Tourism

Unit 4: Tourism and Events Promotion

Visual Arts A/T/M

Visual Art is integral to our lives and is fundamental to how we communicate, express and explore ideas. The study of Visual Arts involves making and responding focussing on nurturing the development of individual creativity while enhancing a student’s ability to critically interpret, analyse, evaluate and express themselves. It provides an excellent foundation and preparation for future pathways in employment, creative industries or further tertiary study in the creative Arts.

Students studying a unit in Visual Art experience Teacher Directed and Student Directed practical tasks while maintaining a Visual Diary, research and written tasks. Students have the opportunity to participate in a range of enrichment programs, events and projects within the school and the local community. Students develop their skills in visual presentation and are encouraged to display and exhibit their work in the school and wider community.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Units: Exploring Art / Exploring Ceramics

Units: Drawing/Painting/ Ceramics

Units: Drawing /Painting/Ceramics

Units: Negotiated Study / Portfolio Preparation

Visual Arts A/T/M - Graphic Communication and Animation

In broad terms, learning in Visual Arts involves making and responding. Students learn as artists, by making art works that communicate to audiences. They learn as audiences, by responding critically and ethically to art works. These actions are taught together as each depends on the other. Students explore the elements and principles, techniques, purpose and media used in graphic communication and design.

Graphic Communication and Animation is the digital arm of the Visual Arts at Hawker College and is suitable to students who are considering further study in the, Visual Arts, Design, Graphic Design, Architecture, Web Design, Photography, Media and Education should consider either the Tertiary or Accredited course in Visual Arts. Students can achieve an ATAR score at a Tertiary level and the may also create a portfolio of work that allows them to apply for a wide range of University and TAFE courses.

Sample Unit Pattern:

Unit 1: Graphic Communication and Design

This unit is an introduction and exploration of elements and principles, techniques, purpose and media used in graphic communication and design, including typography, collage and illustration. Students understand the emergence new forms of communication and its relationship to previous art movements, techniques and styles. Students respond to a design brief from an actual or fictional client, using a design process  and appropriate software to produce a portfolio of visual works that meets the clients’ needs. They analyse and critique artworks using the Interpretive Frameworks.

Unit 2: Graphic Communication for the Screen

Graphic Communication for the Screen includes design for devices using software such as the Adobe Creative Cloud series. Development of documents for smart phones, ipads, ebooks and other electronic devices will be explored through wire framing and the elements of design to produce a body of work.

Understanding the emergence of new forms of communication and the relationship to art movements, techniques and styles such as Post-Modernism.

Visual language contexts used to create and define Graphic Communication for the  Screen using appropriate software to express and communicate ideas such as Photoshop, In design, Illustrator and Dreamweaver. Students will critique artworks using the Interpretive Frameworks.

Unit 3: 2D Animation for the Web

Unit 4:.Contemporary Game Design